In memory of Stefano Fenoaltea

In memory of Stefano Fenoaltea

Stefano Fenoaltea, economist and economic historian, passed away unexpectedly on the 14th of September, 2020. The funeral will take place Wednesday, 16 September, at the church of San Biagio in Sacrofano.

Educated at Harvard, Stefano taught economics and economic history at several US and Italian universities in his career. From 2003 until his retirement in 2013, he was Professor of Applied Economics at the University of Rome, Tor Vergata; more recently he was Fellow of the Luigi Einaudi Foundation of Turin, which in July published his latest book, _Reconstructing the Past: Revised Estimates of Italy’s Product, 1861-1913_ [ttps://www.fondazioneeinaudi.it/appena-pubblicato-reconstructing-the-past-revised-estimates-of-italys-product-1861-1913-di-stefano-fenoaltea/]. Stefano was a pioneer of New Economic History and one of the most important economic historians of his generation. After contributing to some of the great debates in economic history, he settled down to a career-long focus on the reconstruction and interpretation of economic development in Liberal Italy, leaving an indelible imprint on the discipline in this country.

In recent years, while continuing the tireless revision of his estimates and articulating deep reflections on the methods and history of economic history (which are also treated in his latest book), Stefano also made a great contribution to the founding and the activities of ASE. Not only the initial idea but also the practical, organisational details of the ASE “workshops” were the work of Stefano, who was generous with his time and energy - in his own unique style, which could be brusque but was always inspired by an inexhaustible curiosity and intellectual rigour - to create a forum for the intellectual development of our community, especially for younger scholars.

The news of Stefano’s death is a blow to the entire ASE community. Our thoughts are with his family and close friends with whom we share the memory of an exceptional scholar and man. We will miss him terribly.